NES vs Famicom Switch Online apps – February 2019 update

Welp, Nintendo has done it again. The NES app only gets two new games while the Japanese version gets three. It’s also interesting to note that this is also the first time there’s a second Special version for a game that already had one before (Metroid). Below is the list of games added on the NES version.

  • Kirby’s Adventure
  • Super Mario Bros. 2
  • (SP) Blaster Master (Starts fully powered up on area 8)
  • (SP2) Metroid (Starts fully powered up right before the final area)

And here’s the list of games added on the Family Computer – Nintendo Switch Online app.

  • Kirby’s Adventure
  • Tsuppari Oozumou [つっぱり大相撲]
  • Super Mario USA (aka, Super Mario Bros. 2)
  • (SP) Blaster Master (Same changes as NES app)
  • (SP2) Metroid (Famicom Disk Version, same changes as NES app)

The sumo game from Tecmo was never released outside of the region. So, once again, instead of replacing the game for a different one, Nintendo simply decided to skip it.

First Play – Defense Grid 2 on Switch (plus impressions and other info)

Defense Grid 2 is coming to Switch and we recently had the chance to see it in action through an exclusive Mixer stream. Now with a review code, you can see my first play in the video below.

Considering the game was originally made for Xbox One and PS4, the game runs pretty well on Switch. It’s not completely smooth but it seems to barely drop frames when it does. Other information I got from the previous stream was that the game runs at 1080p when docked and 720p when in portable. Also, from the time I got to play it, the game looks good, sharp textures and graphics.

As for the gameplay, it is a well made tower defense game. In a good way, it knows what it is, does well that aspect, and doesn’t try to be anything else. It’s easy to pick up and play and the controls make sense. There’s a story of aliens to give it context too that you’ll be hearing or reading, even though there doesn’t seem to be any real cutscene.

As for other technical details that you may be wondering about, the game does support Cloud Save Backup and Switch Video Capture. There’s online highscores which can be filtered between friends or worldwide and the game features new missions on Switch that were previously only available on the VR version of the game. The file size is also not that big, which is great.

So far, it seems to be a great game if you are into strategy or, more specifically, tower-defense games. By the way, I also asked during the Mixer stream and, apparently, they seem to be planning some sort of physical release too. (or at least trying to get one)

NES vs Famicom Switch Online apps – January 2019 update

January has arrived and with it comes the biggest difference yet between the NES and Famicom apps of the Nintendo Switch. On November, the Famicom version of the app got one more SP version that NES didn’t get, but it was also because it didn’t need it. This time, though, Japanese users will get one extra game.

Below is the full list of games added on the Nintendo Entertainment System – Nintendo Switch Online app.

  • Blaster Master
  • Zelda 2
  • (SP) Ninja Gaiden (Starts on stage 6-4, right before the final boss.)
  • (SP) Ghosts’n Goblins (Starts on stage 6 of the first run.)

And here’s the list of games added on the Family Computer – Nintendo Switch Online app.

  • Blaster Master
  • Joy Mech Fight [ジョイメカファイト]
  • Zelda 2 (Famicom Disk System version)
  • (SP) Ninja Gaiden (Same as above.)
  • (SP) Ghosts’n Goblins (Same as above.)

As you can see, Japan got the usual three games, but one of them was never released outside of the region. So instead of replacing the game for a different one, Nintendo simply decided to just omit it and leave it to just two new games for the people using the NES version.

NES vs Famicom Switch Online apps – December update

A bit late but still in time as it’s still December (and 2018) while I’m publishing this. 😅 Anyway, this time there wasn’t much difference between the two apps.

The main difference this time is that the Famicom app got (for obvious reasons) the Famicom Disk version of SP Metroid instead of the cartridge version. So you have enhanced sound effects in the Japanese version compared the NES one. (Including Ridley sound effects whenever he’s hurt)

Besides that, the differences are simple. Adventures of Lolo levels seem to be harder in the Famicom and SP Dr. Mario starts from a slightly different save state due to the random nature of the game.